Costa Rican Expressions for Rain and Water

In Spanish there are a lot of words and expressions that have to do with water and rain. While this list is not all of the verbiage but enough of it to have fun with and useful now that the rainy season has arrived here in Costa Rica.

A las aguas mansas hay que tenerles miedo – be careful of calm waters (literally). Beware of the meek and mild (figuratively).

Abril lluvioso, saca a mayo florido y hermoso – April showers bring May flowers.

Agua bendita – a loose woman. Everyone sticks their hand in the holy water. Get it? Literally this means holy water.

Agua dulce – fresh water.

Agua potable – drinking water.

Agua salada – salt water.

Agua de abajo depende de agua de arriba – upstream the cows urinate in the water, and downstream people drink it. The water downstream depends on the water upstream.

Agua de lluvia – rain water.

Aguas negras – sewage.

Agua pasada no mueve molina – it’s no good crying over spilt milk. Also No llorar sobre la leche derramada.

Agua que no has de beber, dejalo correr – If you’re not going to drink the water, then let it run. Other possible translation: You shouldn’t get mixed up in things that are of no interest to you or if you’re not going marry a person then let him or her go.

Aguacero – a rain storm.

Aguado – a boring person.

Aguafiestas – party pooper, killjoy.

Aguamar – jellyfish. Medusa is also used.

Aguar la fiesta – to spoil the party.

Ahogarse en un vaso de agua – to make a mountain out of a molehill.

Baldazo – a heavy rain. Literally, a bucket full.

Caerle como balde de agua fría – to not like something or someone. Me cae como balde de agua fría. You may also say Me cae como una bomba. If you really want to be vulgar and insulting you can say Me cae en la pura picha. I do not recommend the latter if you value you life.

Cambiarle el agua al pajarito – to take a pee (change the bird’s water)

Cuando corren los canales, no salgas de tus umbrales – when it rains a lot, don’t leave the house.

Dar agua a los caites – to flee.

Diluvio – a pouring rain.

Echarse al agua – to take the plunge (figurative) or to tell on someone.

Abril lluvioso, saca a mayo florido y hermoso

En su charco – to do what one likes (in one’s pond)

Estar como agua para chocolate – to be mad or estar hirviendo (boiling).

Estar con agua al cuello – to be up to one’s neck in something.

Garuar – to drizzle in Costa Rica.

Hombre al agua! – Man overboard!

Lo que por agua se viene y por agua se va – Easy come, easy go.

Las desgracias nunca vienen solas – When it rains it pours.

Las manos aguadas – butterfingers. Manos de mantequilla is also used.

Le va a llover – something is going to happen to you in abundance. Le va a llover dinero – You will make a lot of money.

Llover a cántaros or llover zapos (toads) y ranas (frogs)– to rain cats and dogs.

Llover sobre mojados – to have one bad thing happen after another. When it rains it pours.

Lloviznar – means to drizzle.

Llueva o truene – come rain or shine.

Lluvioso – rainy.

Mañana oscura tarde segura – rainy weather in the morning gives way to a dry afternoon.

Metérsele el agua – to go crazy.

Nadar entre dos aguas – to be indecisive or to be sitting on the fence.

No alcanzar para agua – to make ends meet or scrape by. No dar ni agua – to be very stingy.

No hallar el agua en el mar – can’t see the forest through the trees.

No te agüites – Don’t get sad!

Pasado por agua – soft boiled.

Pelillo de gato – drizzle. Llovizna is the correct Spanish word.

Sereno – Morning dew in Costa Rica. Rocío is the correct word in Spanish.

Se me hace agua la boca – my mouth is watering.

Venir como agua de mayo – to be a godsend.

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